Tag: art

Kentucky Master Artists Awarded Arts Council Grants

HINDMAN, KY – Seven Kentucky master artists have been awarded Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grants from the Kentucky Arts Council.

The Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant provides $3,000 to a Kentucky master folk or traditional artist to teach skills, practices and culture to less experienced artists from the same community during the course of a year.

The seven recipients are folk or traditional artists who are considered masters within their community and who have identified an apprentice from the same community who has potential to become a master. Both master and apprentice must be Kentucky residents.

Douglas Naselroad, a Master Luthier from Winchester, KY, has worked to establish the Appalachian School of Luthiery in Hindman, KY, for the past four years.  A previous awardee of the Folk Apprenticeship grant, in recent years, Naselroad received the 2016 Kentucky Governor’s Award in the Arts in the Folk Tradition Category on behalf of the Appalachian Artisan Center’s Hindman Dulcimer Project and in 2017, was awarded the Homer Ledford Award in Luthiery.  He and his apprentice, Kris Patrick, have committed to make at least two instruments in the coming year from Appalachian hardwoods such as Kentucky Black Locust, Black Walnut, and Red Spruce.  The use of sustainable Appalachian hardwoods in instruments made at the Appalachian School of Luthiery is a defining feature of the Troublesome Creek Stringed Instruments label.

Kris Patrick, from Mousie, KY, in Knott County has apprenticed at the Luthiery in Hindman since 2014,  and has already built several “Uncle Ed Thomas” style dulcimers, a tenor ukulele, and a flat iron style mandolin.  With the assistance provided this year by the Kentucky Arts Council Folk Apprenticeship Grant, he hopes to add guitars to his ever-growing list of instrument achievements.

“The folk and Apprenticeship Grant has been key to developing new talent in Luthiery.  It is not only a help, but represents an incredible encouragement and validation to emerging artists,” said Naselroad.

The masters and apprentices who will receive funding include:

  • Cynthia Sue Massek (Willisburg), who will teach Appalachian women’s music to Melody Youngblood (Berea);
  • Lakshmi Sriraman (Lexington), who will teach Bharatanatyam (Indian dance style) to Vasundhara Parameswaran (Lexington);
  • Justin Bonar-Bridges (Ft. Thomas), who will teach traditional Irish music and Clare style fiddling to Emmanuel Gray (Covington);
  • Hong Shao (Nicholasville), who will teach pipa (traditional Chinese stringed instrument) to Leah Werking(Carlisle);
  • Douglas Naselroad (Winchester/Hindman), who will teach guitar making to Kris Patrick (Mousie);
  • Gary Cornett (Louisville), who will teach old time Kentucky fiddling and luthiery to Walter Lay (Louisville); and
  • John Harrod (Owenton), who will teach eastern Kentucky old time fiddle tunes and style to James Webb(Frankfort).

Visit the Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant page of the arts council’s website for more information or contact Mark Brown, arts council folk and traditional arts director, at[email protected] or 502-892-3115.

Information about the Appalachian School of Luthiery at the Appalachian Artisan Center in Hindman can be found online at www.artisancenter.net .

 

“EpiCentre Exhibit”

Exhibit Dates:  Jan – Mar 2017

Reception Date:  Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 6pm

Regional artists from the Whitesburg arts collective EpiCentre Arts, Anita Bentley, Jeff Chapman-Crane, Elaine Conradi, Chris Day, Angelyn Debord, Lacy Hale, Pam Oldfield Meade, Jonathan Nickles, and Elizabeth Sanders contribute new work to an exhibit displayed at the Appalachian Artisan Center.

Ranging in style and technique, from traditional to fun and avant-garde, this exhibit takes viewers on a journey across our mountain landscapes, to explore the expansive imaginations of artists from Central Appalachia.

“Vessels” Exhibit

Exhibit dates:  November 2016- March 2017

Reception:  February 16, 2017, 6-7pm

Jim Harrison’s polychromatic, segmented, wood-turned vessels dazzle viewers with their intricate details.  Drawing inspiration from the forms and banded decorative details of Native American pottery, Harrison’s simple vessel shapes belie the sophistication behind their creation.  Each piece is inscribed with the number of individual pieces that comprise the whole.

 

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