News & Updates

AAC named Finalist for ArtPlaceAmerica Grant Award!

Appalachian Artisan Center’s Culture of Recovery Project

is a finalist for ArtPlace America’s 2017 National Creative Placemaking Fund

 

Extremely competitive national grant program will consider 70 projects  

 

(June 6, 2017) Today, ArtPlace America announced thatAppalachian Artisan Center’s Culture of Recovery Project is one of 70 finalists for the 2017 National Creative Placemaking Fund (NCPF).  ArtPlace selected these 70 proposals from 987 applications, making AAC’s project one of just 7% of the projects across the country to make this cut.

 

ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund is a highly competitive national program, receiving 987 applications this year. Investing money in communities across the country in which artists, arts organizations, and arts and culture activity help drive community development change across 10 sectors of community planning and development: agriculture and food; economic development; education and youth; environment and energy; health; housing; immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development.

The Appalachian Artisan Center’s proposed Culture of Recovery Project seeks to utilize the arts in the battle against substance abuse in Appalachia.
The drug addiction epidemic, now of concern nationally, began in eastern Kentucky well over a decade ago
with unprecedented abuse of prescription pain killers. Out-migration is gutting the local economy, and
residents who are in recovery face barriers to employment. This project will marry two cultures of recovery:
that of those combatting addiction, and that of those working to reclaim the traditional arts and crafts of the
area. This project will begin by incorporating art- and craft-based therapies as part of recovery programs and
link them with apprenticeships and ongoing workforce and small business development opportunities.

“These seventy finalists are extraordinary examples of the ways that artists, arts organizations, and communities are thinking about working together,” said ArtPlace Director of National Grantmaking F. Javier Torres. “We look forward to learning more about all of them, as we visit with them this summer.”

“Each of these projects has proposed something extraordinary and important,” added ArtPlace Executive Director Jamie Bennett. “We would love to be able to invest in all of them, and know that choices ahead of us will be extraordinarily difficult.”

 

The complete list of the 2017 finalists for ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund may be found here.

The Appalachian Artisan Center aims to develop the economy of eastern Kentucky through arts, culture, and heritage.

AAC is dedicated to supporting artists by helping them create and grow successful businesses. The Center provides assistance to artists in many ways including business plan development, training and continuing education opportunities, studio space, and a venue to sell and exhibit their work.

 

About ArtPlace America

ArtPlace America (ArtPlace) is a ten-year collaboration among 16 partner foundations, along with 8 federal agencies and 6 financial institutions, that works to position arts and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development in order to help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities.

 

ArtPlace focuses its work on creative placemaking, projects in which art plays an intentional and integrated role in place-based community planning and development. This brings artists, arts organizations, and artistic activity into the suite of placemaking strategies pioneered by Jane Jacobs and her colleagues, who believed that community development must be locally informed, human-centric, and holistic.

Appalachian Artisan Center featured in NEA Arts Magazine!

The Appalachian Artisan Center was featured in the Summer 2017 issue of NEA Arts Magazine.

Click the link below to read more!

“Creative Approaches to Problem-Solving: Embracing Kentucky’s Traditions at the Appalachian Artisan Center” by Rebecca Sutton

 

 

Kentucky Master Artists Awarded Arts Council Grants

HINDMAN, KY – Seven Kentucky master artists have been awarded Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grants from the Kentucky Arts Council.

The Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant provides $3,000 to a Kentucky master folk or traditional artist to teach skills, practices and culture to less experienced artists from the same community during the course of a year.

The seven recipients are folk or traditional artists who are considered masters within their community and who have identified an apprentice from the same community who has potential to become a master. Both master and apprentice must be Kentucky residents.

Douglas Naselroad, a Master Luthier from Winchester, KY, has worked to establish the Appalachian School of Luthiery in Hindman, KY, for the past four years.  A previous awardee of the Folk Apprenticeship grant, in recent years, Naselroad received the 2016 Kentucky Governor’s Award in the Arts in the Folk Tradition Category on behalf of the Appalachian Artisan Center’s Hindman Dulcimer Project and in 2017, was awarded the Homer Ledford Award in Luthiery.  He and his apprentice, Kris Patrick, have committed to make at least two instruments in the coming year from Appalachian hardwoods such as Kentucky Black Locust, Black Walnut, and Red Spruce.  The use of sustainable Appalachian hardwoods in instruments made at the Appalachian School of Luthiery is a defining feature of the Troublesome Creek Stringed Instruments label.

Kris Patrick, from Mousie, KY, in Knott County has apprenticed at the Luthiery in Hindman since 2014,  and has already built several “Uncle Ed Thomas” style dulcimers, a tenor ukulele, and a flat iron style mandolin.  With the assistance provided this year by the Kentucky Arts Council Folk Apprenticeship Grant, he hopes to add guitars to his ever-growing list of instrument achievements.

“The folk and Apprenticeship Grant has been key to developing new talent in Luthiery.  It is not only a help, but represents an incredible encouragement and validation to emerging artists,” said Naselroad.

The masters and apprentices who will receive funding include:

  • Cynthia Sue Massek (Willisburg), who will teach Appalachian women’s music to Melody Youngblood (Berea);
  • Lakshmi Sriraman (Lexington), who will teach Bharatanatyam (Indian dance style) to Vasundhara Parameswaran (Lexington);
  • Justin Bonar-Bridges (Ft. Thomas), who will teach traditional Irish music and Clare style fiddling to Emmanuel Gray (Covington);
  • Hong Shao (Nicholasville), who will teach pipa (traditional Chinese stringed instrument) to Leah Werking(Carlisle);
  • Douglas Naselroad (Winchester/Hindman), who will teach guitar making to Kris Patrick (Mousie);
  • Gary Cornett (Louisville), who will teach old time Kentucky fiddling and luthiery to Walter Lay (Louisville); and
  • John Harrod (Owenton), who will teach eastern Kentucky old time fiddle tunes and style to James Webb(Frankfort).

Visit the Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant page of the arts council’s website for more information or contact Mark Brown, arts council folk and traditional arts director, at[email protected] or 502-892-3115.

Information about the Appalachian School of Luthiery at the Appalachian Artisan Center in Hindman can be found online at www.artisancenter.net .

 

“EpiCentre Exhibit”

Exhibit Dates:  Jan – Mar 2017

Reception Date:  Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 6pm

Regional artists from the Whitesburg arts collective EpiCentre Arts, Anita Bentley, Jeff Chapman-Crane, Elaine Conradi, Chris Day, Angelyn Debord, Lacy Hale, Pam Oldfield Meade, Jonathan Nickles, and Elizabeth Sanders contribute new work to an exhibit displayed at the Appalachian Artisan Center.

Ranging in style and technique, from traditional to fun and avant-garde, this exhibit takes viewers on a journey across our mountain landscapes, to explore the expansive imaginations of artists from Central Appalachia.

Appalachian Artisan Center hosts Kentucky Arts Council ‘Ways of Seeing’ exhibit

HINDMAN, Ky. — Appalachian Artisan Center (AAC) has been selected as the first of several venues across Kentucky to host the Kentucky Arts Council’s (KAC) traveling exhibit titled “Ways of Seeing.”

“Ways of Seeing” features artwork that depicts an alternate reality. The work is abstract, conceptual, fantasy-based and experimental. Each piece is by an artist who has been accepted into the Kentucky Crafted program or who has been awarded an Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship.

“We are thrilled to be hosting the newest exhibit from the Kentucky Arts Council,” says AAC Director of Programs, Jessica Evans.  “Visitors will experience something completely out of the norm from a group of talented artists from all over the state. We want to get people talking about art again!”

A reception for “Ways of Seeing” will be held in conjunction with the Grand Re-Opening Celebration at the newly renovated Cody Building in Historic Downtown Hindman, KY.  The event will begin at 6pm and include music, Studio and Gallery Tours, and refreshments.

“‘Ways of Seeing’ transports the viewer to a different time and place and gives them a sense of otherworldliness,” said Lori Meadows, Kentucky Arts Council Executive Director. “We’re glad to have The Appalachian Artisan Center on board as one of our partner venues for this fascinating exhibit.”

The Appalachian Artisan Center is headquartered at 30 West Main Street and is open 10am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, and 10am to 4pm on Saturdays. The “Ways of Seeing” exhibit will run from October 3 to December 22, 2016.

Artists participating in “Ways of Seeing” are:

  •       Trent Altman, Louisville
  •       Lisa Austin, Louisville
  •       Pat Banks, Richmond
  •       Patricia Brock, Louisville
  •       Geoff Carr, Louisville
  •       Bruce Frank, Georgetown
  •       Linda Fugate-Blumer, Lexington
  •       Timothy Gold, Independence
  •       Ellen Guyer, Lexington
  •       Michael McCardwell, Shelbyville
  •       Gary Mesa-Gaido, Morehead
  •       Yvonne Petkus, Bowling Green
  •       Patricia Ritter, Burkesville
  •       Arturo Alonzo Sandoval, Lexington
  •       Sandy Sasso, Almo
  •       Karen Spears Springate, Lexington
  •       Deborah Stratford, Louisville
  •       Jenny Zeller, Louisville

“Ways of Seeing” will also travel to the following Kentucky venues:

  •       January – February 2017: Eastern Kentucky University Center for the Arts, Richmond
  •       March – April 2017: Whitley County Fine Arts, Williamsburg
  •       May – August 2017: Center for Rural Development, Somerset
  •       September – December 2017: Glema Mahr Center for the Arts, Madisonville Community College, Madisonville

For more information on “Ways of Seeing,” contact Jessica Evans, Director of Programs, by phone: 606-785-9855 or by email: [email protected]

The Appalachian Artisan Center is dedicated to developing the economy of eastern Kentucky through our arts, culture, and heritage.  The Center provides assistance to artists who wish to create and grow successful businesses.

The Kentucky Arts Council, the state arts agency, fosters environments for Kentuckians to value, participate in and benefit from the arts. Kentucky Arts Council funding is provided by the Kentucky General Assembly and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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